Menu Close

Forum

Please or Register to create posts and topics.

Why I Think The Wuhan Virus Was Likely Man-Made

https://thefederalist.com/2020/10/13/why-i-think-the-wuhan-virus-was-likely-man-made-but-escaped-by-accident/

Accidentally on purpose.

It wouldn't be the first time a deadly pathogen escaped from a bio-warfare lab.   And it probably won't be the last.

[https://www.forbes.com/sites/coronavirusfrontlines/2020/04/28/a-bioweapon-expert-explains-four-ways-a-pathogen-can-escape-from-a-lab/]

And there are several countries doing work in this field:

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_warfare#List_of_BW_institutions,_programs,_projects_and_sites_by_country]

Not to mention that amateur research, including in genetically-engineering current pathogens for maximum lethality, is now a very real possibility.  (Imagine another Bin Laden, with plenty of money, and patience.)

It's  something for which  we must be prepared to respond.  Exactly how, I'm not sure ... it should be put on our "to do" list.

But this brings up another point to discuss:

  We   -- the CDF -- need, nationally, a "contingency plans" list,  to be given to each local unit, for all likely disasters: what we should have ready in storage, before the event; what we should do immediately when it -- the event -- is confirmed; and a plan of action. I suppose FEMA and others have something like this which we can borrow from.  The first step is the production of short information leaflets and/or posters, which inform the general public about what each individual can do.  This will help publicize us, establish our credibility, and ... to the extent members of the general public follow our advice, ease the burden on us if a disaster of some sort actually occurs.

For example: a big nuclear accident, or a nuclear war of any size, may result in the release into the atmosphere of a load of Iodine 131  -- a very radioactive isotope of iodine -- which will come down in the subsequent fallout.  Your thyroid gland takes up iodine, and if it takes up Iodine-131, it may become cancerous. This happened after Chernobyl. There's a simple way to guard against this, which is to flood your system with a lot of iodine during the short period in which iodine-131 is active. (It has a half-life of eight days, so after two months it has essentially vanished.)

You do this by taking potassium iodide pills -- these are especially important for children, adolescents, and pregnant women. (You can minimize taking it in by breathing by wearing a mask or staying indoors -- the problem arises when it gets in the food chain, or the water supply.)   You can buy Iodine (the non-radioactive isotope) for about a dime a tablet, probably less if you buy in bulk. Two tablets will supposedly protect you for 48 hours.  Their theoretical shelf life is 7 years but in practice it's an inherently stable chemical and probably can be stored indefinitely.

Therefore: the CDF should print this information up in a leaflet  (with references, which I can supply), and every CDF unit should distribute this leaflet passively: ie have it on literature tables, and make it otherwise available: post it on bulletin boards  (with the CDF contact details). Urge everyone to keep a bottle of these pills, perhaps provide a couple of links to cheap reliable suppliers.  (In some states, the state government may, in theory, have a stockpile of potassium iodide for distribution to the public after a nuclear event -- you can imagine how well that will work out.)

A unit that has the resources might even consider being an at- or near-to cost reseller, but that probably requires some thought.

And then it might spend a   bit to have its own supply.

This is the sort of activity that can begin to make us known and respected in the community -- no dramatics, no the-sky-is-falling, just a sober, low-key, better-to-be-prepared, warning, for something which has a favorable cost-benefit ratio.

At some point on the future there will be a nuclear incident -- an accident at a powerplant, the threat of a nuclear exchange -- and when this is in the news, is the perfect time for each local CDF unit to send  a press release to its local media, with the information here. [These press releases should be prepared nationally, and be part of what the national organization supplies to each local unit.]

So, what I am proposing is that we should consider having a set of standardized CDF one-page poster/leaflets with the theme: What You Can Do Now to Prepare For __________________    with the blank filled in with the  different possible emergency scenarios. It should have our logo, ideally in color, and of course the final 'what you can do' should be: "Support your local CDF, either as a full member, or as an associate.  Contact us here:________________"

We   -- the CDF -- need, nationally, a "contingency plans" list,  to be given to each local unit, for all likely disasters: what we should have ready in storage, before the event; what we should do immediately when it -- the event -- is confirmed; and a plan of action. I suppose FEMA and others have something like this which we can borrow from.  The first step is the production of short information leaflets and/or posters, which inform the general public about what each individual can do.  This will help publicize us, establish our credibility, and ... to the extent members of the general public follow our advice, ease the burden on us if a disaster of some sort actually occurs.

Hey Doug, already working on something along these lines.  And I welcome any and all scenario suggestions or ideas for prep or specific response plans, such as your ideas on stockpiling iodine and printing/distributing lefalets, I'm the one sort of spearheading the development of this, and believe me it is a daunting task, so rather than clog up the forums, it would probably be best if folks just messaged me directly.

Rather than reinvent the wheel, maybe we should just reference the already made stuff at https://www.ready.gov/

Quote from azpat on October 15, 2020, 4:15 PM

Rather than reinvent the wheel, maybe we should just reference the already made stuff at https://www.ready.gov/

Yeah, already referencing that. Sadly most of it is pretty useless. But I am saving and incorporating anything that might be of value for us. Stuff like, You're safer at home, and Crawl under your desk and wait for help, really isn't targeted at us. OTOH their list of incidents is useful info. As is some of the info in some of their pdf files. But almost none of their stuff is designed for teams looking to respond to these events. They assume that the government and official channels, will be the only ones doing that. So a lot of their stuff is aimed at how individuals who just happen to get caught up, can respond. Or it is aimed at those official channel responders.